Liquid Copper Fungicide

By Southern Ag. Click here for the label.

From the Label

ACTIVE INGREDIENTS BY WT.

Copper diammonia diacetate complex*…………………………. 27.15%
[Bis(acetate-O) Diamminecopper] CAS No. 13822-80-5
OTHER INGREDIENTS:…… 72.85%
Total……………………………….100.00%
*Metallic Copper Equivalent, 8.0%
Contains 0.772 lbs Copper per gallon

APPLICATION:

  • Fruits and Nuts: Mix specified rate in 1 gallon of water and apply 3 gallons of mixed solution to a small tree or bush, 6 gallons of mined solution to a medium size tree, or 9 gallons of mixed solution to a large tree. Thoroughly spray tree to point of runoff, including upper and lower surfaces of foliage. Do not overspray.
  • Vegetables: Mix specified rate in 1 gallon of water apply 2 gallons of mixed solution per 1,000 sq. ft. (1 gallon of mixed solution per 500 sq. ft.)
  • Miscellaneous: For trees: mix specified rate in 1 gallon of water and apply 3 gallons of mixed solution to a small tree, 6 gallons of mixed solution to a medium-size tree, or 9 gallons of mixed solution to a large tree. Thoroughly spray tree to point of runoff, including upper and lower surfaces of foliage. Do not overspray. Do not mix more spray solution than needed.
  • If applied with other products, add Liquid Copper Fungicide last.

“Specified Rates”:

  • Cucurbits – Downey Mildew – 1-2 tsp/gallon
    • Cucumbers, Pumpkins, Summer/Winter squash, Watermelons, Muskmelons
  • Crucifers – Downey & Powdery Mildew and leaf spots – 3-4 tsp/gallon
    • Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, bok choy, arugula, Brussels sprouts, collards, watercress, and radishes.
  • Spinach – 3 tsp/gallon
  • Tomatoes – 3-5 tsp/gallon

Copper: Stone fruits are sensitive to copper. Bordeaux mixture causes russeting of apples and may stunt cantaloupe and watermelon leaves. Copper compounds should be used with caution on any cucurbit crop. Injury is most likely to occur when materials are applied to wet leaves and under damp, slow-drying conditions. Copper containing sprays will also defoliate peaches, plums, and apricots. From TAMU here.


No Surfactants

Research has shown that adding surfactants with copper fungicides greatly increased the injury to foliage. This is because the surfactant allows the copper to spread over more of the leaf surface and contact more stomates as well as to penetrate more through cuticles. From here.

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